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Wheel Loader Rental (3)

Front-end loaders, also called wheel loaders, have large buckets fixed to the front of the tractor...Show More

Front-end loaders, also called wheel loaders, have large buckets fixed to the front of the tractor. They transport heavy materials, such as dirt, rubble, and debris, on worksites. Front-end loaders come equipped with tires, which cause less damage to road surfaces than tracks, making them a better choice than a bulldozer in some situations.

You can find these machines, also known as bucket loaders and skip loaders, commonly used at agricultural, waste management, mining, and other industrial job sites. Wheel loaders can be combined with a range of attachments, such as augers, brooms, lifting jibs, rakes, shovels, and grapplers. Check out the FAQs below to learn more.

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Equipment ID: 24-20

2 cu yd Articulating Wheel Loader

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Equipment ID: 24-30

3 cu yd Articulating Wheel Loader

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Equipment ID: 24-40

4 cu yd Articulating Wheel Loader

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The makes/models shown are examples only and equipment delivered may differ. Contact customer support to check on the availability of specific makes/models.

More About Wheel Loaders

FAQs

How much does it cost to rent a front-end loader?

The cost to rent a wheel loader depends on the vehicle’s carrying capacity (measured in cubic yards). For instance, a 2.5-cubic-yard articulating wheel loader costs $473 a day, $1,337 a week, or $3,902 a month to rent; a 3-cubic-yard articulating wheel loader costs $484 a day, $1,429 a week, and $4,434 a month; and a 4-cubic-yard articulating wheel loader costs $728 a day, $2,174 a week, and $5,928 a month to rent.

How much can a front-end loader lift?

Wheel loaders have different load capacities depending on their horsepower and bucket capacity.

A small, 20-horsepower wheel loader can lift about 1,800 pounds, while the largest can use its 2,300-horsepower engine to lift 160,000 pounds up to 24 feet high. Bucket capacities vary and the operating payload helps you determine which one fits your job best. Always consult with your BigRentz representative to be sure you select the best fit for your project’s needs.

How much does a front-end loader weigh?

Front-end loaders are designed to move heavy, bulky objects like rocks, tree branches, and debris, such as broken-up asphalt and concrete, at a construction or demolition site. If you’re lifting a heavy object, you need leverage and stability in order to move it, so utilizing sturdy, heavy front-end loaders can help.

Weights of front-end loaders vary by size and manufacturer. Sizes and brands available may vary by location, but some mid-sized wheel loaders range in weight from 25,814 pounds to more than 43,700 pounds while compact wheel loaders weigh in anywhere from 9,414 pounds to up to more than 78,000 pounds.

How large are front-end loader buckets?

Small wheel loaders have a bucket capacity of 1 to 2 cubic yards. Capacity rises to 2 to 4.75 cubic yards for medium-sized buckets, reaching 10 cubic yards or more for larger buckets.

Make note of and respect the limits of each machine. Attempting to overload one of these machines beyond its designed capacity can increase wear and reduce how long it will last.

What are common types of wheel loader attachments?

You typically think of wheel loaders with scooping buckets in front, but a number of other attachments can customize your machine for the job you’re doing.

You can swap out your bucket for a corkscrew-shaped auger for digging precise holes or a snowplow to clear a path in winter. You can choose among attachments like shovels, rakes, brooms, and grapplers, which can clamp down to grip items like tree branches between opposable “teeth” to lift and move them out of the way.

Do I need a license to operate a wheel loader?

Yes. Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1926.602, operators of all loaders, including front-end loaders, backhoes, excavators, and skid steers, must be trained and certified. Employers are required to evaluate wheel loader operators every three years.
Online classes are provided by various websites, and certification entails passing a written exam and a practical evaluation.

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