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Scissor Lift Rental (11)

Scissor lifts are a type of aerial work platform used by industrial and construction teams, but they are also commonly used for residential tasks...Show More

Scissor lifts are a type of aerial work platform used by industrial and construction teams, but they are also commonly used for residential tasks. Scissor lifts provide a wide platform that can hold several workers at once. They can reach heights between 20 and 50 feet.

While all scissor lifts generally have the same design and function, electric scissor lifts are more ideal for residential use while rough terrain scissor lifts are better suited for heavy-duty industrial or maintenance jobs. Check out the FAQs below to learn more.

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Equipment ID: 4-7

19 ft Electric Scissor Lift Narrow

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Equipment ID: 4-11

26 ft Electric Scissor Lift Narrow

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Equipment ID: 4-12

26 ft Electric Scissor Lift Wide

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Equipment ID: 4-253

26 ft Rough Terrain Scissor Lift 4WD

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Equipment ID: 4-14

32 ft Electric Scissor Lift Narrow

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Equipment ID: 4-29

32 ft Electric Scissor Lift Wide

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Equipment ID: 4-303

32 ft Rough Terrain Scissor Lift 4WD

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Equipment ID: 4-40

40 ft Electric Scissor Lift Narrow

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Equipment ID: 4-41

40 ft Electric Scissor Lift Wide

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Equipment ID: 4-403

40 ft Rough Terrain Scissor Lift 4WD

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Equipment ID: 4-503

50 ft Rough Terrain Scissor Lift 4WD

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The makes/models shown are examples only and equipment delivered may differ. Contact customer support to check on the availability of specific makes/models.

More About Scissor Lifts

 

Scissor Lift Rental Guide E-Book

 

FAQs

How much does it cost to rent a scissor lift?

Scissor lift rental costs vary depending on the model, size, and jobsite location. They can be rented by the day, week, or month. A 19 foot, narrow electric scissor lift starts at $97/day, $230/week, or $430/month. A 26 foot, wide electric scissor lift starts at $121/day, $338/week, or $624/month. A 32 foot, 4WD, rough-terrain scissor lift starts at $210/day, $533/week, or $1,092/month. Rough terrain scissor lifts typically cost more than electric scissor lifts.

What kind of scissor lift do I need?

The type of scissor lift you need depends on multiple factors including load size, platform size, type of terrain, and height.

Electric scissor lifts generally have smaller frames and can fit through standard doorways and narrow passages when completely folded. Because they are electric-powered and have zero emissions, they are safe for indoor tasks. Typical uses include anything from general ceiling repair jobs to providing a sound platform for painting murals on large walls.

Rough terrain lifts come with four-wheel drive (4WD) and rugged tires for uneven or rough landscapes. They are used by both industrial and maintenance teams for tasks like tree trimming.

Both electric and rough terrain lifts come in different heights and sizes.

Should I use a scissor lift or a boom lift?

The main advantage of a scissor lift is its larger platform. Unlike a boom lift, whose bucket typically accommodates just one person, a scissor lift can carry multiple people as well as loads that need to be elevated. Boom lifts are also more expensive, while scissor lifts are affordably priced rentals.

A boom lift, also called a bucket lift or cherry picker, is a piece of equipment that can raise someone in a small bucket or compact platform. It can elevate them more than three times as high as a scissor lift. If you need to go beyond the 40- or 50-foot maximum height of most scissor lifts, you will probably need a boom lift.

A boom lift is also a better choice if you need to move in different directions. The base of a telescopic boom lift can rotate, giving you more directional flexibility. An articulating boom lift offers help in reaching hard-to-access locations, thanks to arms that are jointed like a knee or elbow in one or more places. This allows you to move not just up, but up and over.

How high can a scissor lift go?

Scissor lifts can provide access to work sites 19 to 50 feet off the ground, depending on the model. You’ll get greater load-bearing capacity with heavier models. A 19-foot electric lift might weigh between 2,700 and 5,600 pounds and be able to bear 500 to 700 pounds, depending on the model.

By contrast, a wide scissor lift with a 40-foot vertical reach might weigh roughly 8,600 to 13,600 pounds and be able to bear between 800 and 1,500 pounds. A 50-foot rough-terrain lift can weigh from 11,800 to 17,000 pounds and carry up to 2,250 pounds.

Do I need a license to operate a scissor lift?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has no specific regulations that require lift users to be licensed. However, the agency stipulates that only “authorized persons” assigned by an employer to specific duties are permitted to use a scissor lift. This makes employers largely responsible for ensuring that lifts are operated safely.

Under OSHA guidelines, employers must train employees on how to work safely around scissor lifts and understand the hazards they present. OSHA also provides a one-hour scissor lift training course online that covers the importance of inspections; precautions for preventing falls, tips, electrocution, etc.; safety procedures and precautions; applicable OSHA standards; and other key topics.

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