How to Dispose of Concrete Properly

Concrete makes up a large part of our lives and even more so, part of our waste. Disposal of concrete is a growing concern since it made up 85% of all construction and demolition waste in 2018, according to the EPA.

Whether you’re a contractor with excess concrete or a homeowner with too much left over from a DIY project, there are several avenues you can take to find individuals or companies willing to take it off your hands. Leftover concrete can be used in a variety of ways, from driveway paving and gravel substitutes to landscaping mulch and material for new oceanic habitats.

Below we share ways you can safely dispose of your leftover concrete while also doing your part to protect the environment by recycling rather than dumping.

Concrete and asphalt comprised 85% of US C&D waste in 2018.

1. Rent a Dumpster

One of the easiest and most affordable ways to dispose of concrete is to rent a dumpster. Concrete, along with materials like bricks, stone and asphalt can all be thrown in a dumpster. You have the option to rent dumpsters of various sizes in order to best fit your needs. For heavier disposals, you’ll want to make sure you rent a dumpster with the right weight capacity.

Best for: Those with flexible schedules

2. Take it to a Landfill or Transfer Station

If you’d rather dispose of the concrete yourself, another option is to take the leftover concrete to a landfill or transfer station. A transfer station is a central location where municipal solid waste is dropped off by collection crews. Before you dump concrete at either a landfill or transfer station, be sure to contact the facility to ensure they’ll accept it.

This is certainly a wallet-friendly option, but it’s up to you to make as many trips as you may need and to locate the nearest landfill or transfer station to you.

Best for: Those with access to a truck

3. Contact a Building Supplies Retailer

In some cases, building supplies retailers will accept your unused concrete. These businesses typically ask you to haul the concrete to them instead of offering pick-up services.

Best for: Those willing to contact multiple retailers

4. Find a Junk Hauling Company

Hiring a junk hauling company is a great option if you have a large amount of leftover concrete. This is also a convenient option if you don’t have access to a truck to offload the concrete yourself. This option will cost you, but it will save you the time and manual labor of bringing it yourself.

Best for: Those with larger projects

5. Contact a Landscaping Company

Landscaping companies are often looking for leftover concrete for their projects. These landscaping companies typically use leftover concrete as a greener option for creating sidewalks, flower boxes and retaining walls. As for landscaping construction materials companies, they’ll often crush the leftover concrete to use as a base layer for new roads.

Best for: Those looking for a sustainable option

6. Donate to Your Community

Concrete doesn’t come cheap and contractors and local businesses are often on the hunt for leftover concrete they can use for their current projects. One option for finding these groups is to post an advertisement on social media or Craigslist to let your neighbors know that you have leftover concrete up for grabs.

You may be able to make a little money off of the concrete you’re selling, but in most instances, the best outcome is offering the concrete for free in return for someone else hauling it from your site.

Another route is to reach out to nonprofits and community groups to see if they have a need for leftover concrete. They’re often thankful for the free resource and may offer to come to pick it up for you.

Best for: Those willing to sell online or looking to do a good deed

6 different ways to dispose of concrete from construction

Types of Concrete Waste that Can Be Reused

Before you call around to offload your concrete or schedule a rental dumpster, it’s important to note which types of concrete waste can be reused. Here’s a rundown of the most common types that are typically recycled and reused.

  • Concrete Rubble: These large and irregularly shaped concrete pieces are typically used as building stones in walls and slabs for patios and walkways.
  • Concrete Blocks: These are often used when building retaining walls or structural walls.
  • Concrete Mix: This is typically used for pouring driveways, setting fence posts, or laying a home’s foundation.
  • Concrete Chunks: Many landscaping companies will use concrete chunks leftover from projects to use on roads and parking lots.

Bottom Line: There Are Many Concrete Disposal Options

At the end of the day, finding a concrete disposal option that’s right for you is likely going to come down to ease and price. Choosing an option like a dumpster rental allows you the benefits of having experts come and remove your concrete and take it to a proper disposal location. Whether you choose to advertise your leftover concrete or hire professionals, there are disposal options for every budget and preference.

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